What Is A Pour Over At Starbucks All You Need To Know

What Is A Pour Over At Starbucks? All You Need To Know

There is no real need to ask “‘what is a pour over at Starbucks?“‘ it is as the name suggest a pour over coffee from Starbucks made with their specialized pouring tool, a pour over cone.

I’m a big fan of this style of coffee especially when made on a per cup basis, which comes from my time in Vietnam. It’s a lovely laid back, old school approach over there, let the coffee drip, drip, drip away as life goes by.

This article is all about, and literally everything you need to know about Starbucks pour over coffee.

What Is A Pour Over Coffee?

A pour over coffee is a super simple technique that requires very little equipment to produce a great cup of coffee.

The proper brewing technique for this type of coffee requires very little equipment as you pour hot water over fresh ground coffee with a very controlled and slow circular fashion through a paper filter. As the water is passed through the grounds in that circular fashion and through the cone filter, you end up with a good clean taste.

What Is A Pour Over Coffee
A pour over coffee

Read: Are Starbucks cups BPA free?

How To Brew A Starbucks Pour Over Coffee Like A Pro

Let’s get you making a great a cuppa Joe with the correct brewing method, cone brewer, great coffee grounds and fresh beans.

Let’s get started and get making a highly recommended coffee that is certainly worth trying out.

Equipment Needed:

A filter, a paper filter is fine. If you use a paper filter, ensure it is unbleached and a cone filter. For a better flavor profile, use a metal filter or a cloth filter. Metal is best, then cloth, finally paper. I’ll explain why later.

You will also need a good coffee cup for your coffee, a gooseneck kettle, which is a must for first class pour control. You will need a pour over cone.

Optional: coffee scale and coffee grinder.

How To Brew A Starbucks Pour Over Coffee Like A Pro
Brewing a Starbucks pour over coffee

Read: How much caffeine in Nespresso Pods?

Step 1: Weigh it up!

For truly quality coffee, you absolutely must weigh both your water and ground coffee. You need to use a coffee to water ratio of 15:1 for a good, tasty cup of coffee. A good large 16 ounce cup (480ml) will need 480 grams of water and 32 grams of a medium to coarse grind size.

Step 2: Boil your water: 

The ideal water temperature is 92C to 96C (195F to 205F).This is by far best controlled by using a digital thermometer. More convenient is the use of a digital gooseneck kettle that has the ability to digitally control the temperature of your hot water.

This is much better than a regular hot water kettle in many ways – which I’ll get into more details about later.

Step 3: Grind Your Beans

Since you want to make a Starbucks pour over buy and use their beans. Consult with your local barista as to which is best for the kind of flavor you are trying to achieve. Quite often they use their espresso roast.

You can use any roast at all. Your single origin beans will work well with pour over coffee. Light roasts are great too.

Weigh and grind 32 grams to medium coarse grind. Your grounds should be kosher salt size.

What Is A Pour Over At Starbucks
Grind your beans to a medium coarse size

Step 4: Pre-wet your filter

Wet your paper or cloth filter before you use them. This helps to both bring it up to the same temperature as the water and to help it stick to the side of your cone pour over device, the cone brewer.

Your filter choice has an effect on how your coffee will end up tasting. With a paper filter unbleached organic paper is best. A paper filter will end up with a good clean taste and will filter out the coffee oils.

These oils have an effect on the flavor of your cup of coffee. I like to have as much of the coffee oils in my brew as possible. A cloth filter, will filter some of the oils out and some will get into your coffee This is good. I like to use organic unbleached cotton.

A metal filter allows all of your coffee oils to get into your coffee. It might appear to be a minor thing to change the filter type, but it is a noticable difference in taste. I encourage you to experiement and try it – train up your coffee taste buds.

Step 5: The Coffee Bloom 

Add your coffee grounds to your coffee filter. Shake them on a level surface and ensure they and evenly distributed and flat.

This is where the advantage of a gooseneck kettle starts to come in. With a pencil thin stream slowly pour your hot water in a very controlled circular motion and with extra precision, pour your hot water evenly over your grounds fill the cone to the halfway mark and ensure your grounds are saturated.

Pause for approximately 10 to 20 seconds to allow your grounds to bloom. When they are blooming they give off carbon dioxide gas. There is a degree of skill involved in blooming. With practice you will get it spot in and get the maximum flavor from your beans. Too little and too much is not good.

A Starbucks Pour Over coffee
Bloom your grounds

Step 6: Pour Your Hot Water

once you have bloomed your coffee grounds, move on with pouring your hot water in a slow, controlled fashion with a steady stream of water.

You are aiming for a pencil thin stream from your gooseneck kettle. Pour in a controlled manner in a circular motion, being careful to cover your grounds evenly – this is very important for a good, even extraction.

It is, as someone who has been meditating daily since 2008, a very meditative practice.

Step 7: Enjoy your cuppa

Enjoy your cup of coffee. Pour over with a metal filter is great for getting all the lovely flavor notes from your speciality single origin coffee beans. Alongside a French press, it is one of favorite brewing methods.

Starbucks Pour Over Filter Size

The filter holder at Starbuck for making their pour over coffee takes a #2 or a #4 filter size. A paper cone filter fits into the holder perfectly. This is the same for cloth filters and metal filters.

Starbucks Pour Over Kettle

Starbucks use a digital electronic gooseneck kettle with built in temperature control as their pour over kettle. There are no details or information available as to what brand or model they use.

Starbucks OXO Pour Over

Starbucks does have their own very convenient OXO pour over device to make the process of brewing your coffee easier. This is exactly what it is – a very handy device of convenience.

The functionality of it does not enhance the coffee flavor or help your to get the best possible taste from your beans at all. It is a very handy device, this I am not denying. It is for everyday run-of-the-mill use not for making truly great pour over coffee.

The problem is the way in which the water escapes and drips onto your grounds. It does not ensure a good even pour. If it did it would come with my blessing!

Starbucks Pour Over Brewer & Mug Set

This does look like a good pour over product and complete set to consider. It sits nicely above your cup, ready for you to pour. It is missing an electronic pour over kettle and is thus a not 100% complete set as such.

Starbucks Ceramic Pour Over

This is the same pour over brewer set that is mentioned above. It is made from ceramic and does make brewing coffee, pour over style much easier. It is good, I like it. Starbucks ceramic pour over is designed to make only one cup at a time.

Frappé-Ing It All Up – What Is A Pour Over At Starbucks?

Since you asked the question, what is a pour over at Starbucks, we answered your question comprehensively and gave you a tutorial on how to best make a pour over. Unfortunately, it appears that the franchised coffee outlet does not make coffee as best as they possibly can due to an uneven pour or outlet from their OXO device.

I find this to be very disappointing.

Coffee is love, it's more than love — it's a passion of mine. I've had the luck to have travelled and enjoyed the most exotic of coffee's and unique flavors, brewing methods and techniques of making the perfect coffee from Thai hill tribe coffee to Indonesian volcanic coffee, Malaysian coffee that comes in a tea bag and the array of flavors in Vietnam, from Vanilla to Orange to Coconut to Avocado to even salt coffee and the famous egg coffee. The best part of my coffee adventures is getting to mix with the locals over a nice brew and learning how they make it! I'm cited and referenced on Google Scholar for the topic of coffee.

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