How To Make Starbucks Brown Sugar Syrup - Sweeten Your Sips!

How To Make Starbucks Brown Sugar Syrup – Sweeten Your Sips!

Learning how to make Starbucks brown sugar syrup at home is very convenient when you want to replicate their tasty drinks like a brown sugar oat milk shaken espresso or add amazing earthy caramel notes to your latte.

This copycat recipe replicates the brown sugar simple syrup that you get from Starbucks exactly due to the use of a “secret” ingredient.

Keep reading to find out what the secret ingredient is!

How To Make Starbucks Brown Sugar Syrup – An Overview

This recipe is exactly what you will get in a coffee shop, the best coffee shops and is a great Starbucks copycat recipe for a very tasty simple syrup.  Like all simple syrups, you can use this in all kinds of coffee drinks like a latte, cappuccino, breve and a shaken espresso.

Other uses for it include adding to and drizzling over pancakes, baking and making cocktails.

This particular brown sugar syrup is different and better than the others that you’ll see as it has a twist with maple syrup and sea salt. The recipe sticks with the sugar to water ratio of 1:1.

This simple syrup recipe is very easy to make and can be made in about 5 minutes. While making it, please stick to the 60C (140F) maximum temperature; I’ll tell you why in a moment.

How To Make Starbucks Brown Sugar Syrup
Brown Sugar Syrup Is Great In Coffee Drinks

Read: How to make brown sugar simple syrup

What Is Starbucks Brown Sugar Syrup?

It is one of their many simple syrup flavors that you will find at Starbucks alongside peppermint, classic simple syrup, vanilla simple syrup, caramel, cinnamon caramel, hazelnut, cinnamon dolce, apple brown sugar, honey blend, marshmallow, raspberry, toffee nut, toasted vanilla, Irish cream and more.

The ingredients that are listed on the label are: Water, brown sugar, salt, natural flavors and preservatives.

To copy this flavor of what is sold by Starbucks, this tasty and delightful syrup has cinnamon and maple syrup. This is how I have got this copycat version to replicate exactly the same rich caramel flavor of molasses that is sold by Starbucks and at a significantly reduced cost.

What Does Starbucks Brown Sugar Syrup Taste Like?

Brown sugar syrup has notes of toffee with a touch of molasses and lingering neat rich caramel notes that goes incredibly well with coffee drinks. The flavor is more complex than a simple syrup that has been made with regular white sugar.

There are different types of brown sugar, which naturally alter how your coffee will taste. Light brown sugar, dark brown sugar, Turbinado, Moscovado, Jaggery, Okinawa sugar (black sugar), Piloncillo, Demerara, light brown sugar and dark brown sugar. Each has a differing amount of molasses and are processed differently which alters their flavor.

In this brown sugar syrup recipe, to get the right caramel flavor, we are going to use a light brown sugar which is white sugar with some molasses.

What Does Starbucks Brown Sugar Syrup Taste Like
Starbucks Brown Sugar Syrup Tastes Great In A Cappuccino

Read: How many calories in brown sugar syrup Starbucks?

Starbucks Brown Sugar Syrup Ingredients

Let’s get to the core of this Starbucks brown sugar syrup recipe: all other copycat or DIY recipes are missing the “secret” ingredient from this recipe – maple syrup. The inclusion of maple syrup is what makes it match the same simple syrup at Starbucks.

You must use real maple syrup, not maple-flavored syrup.

Here is the complete ingredient list that you will need:

  • Light Brown Sugar: The key ingredient in the recipe. Of all the different types of brown sugar light brown sugar matches the syrup from Starbucks best.
  • Pure Maple Syrup: It is key that you use pure maple syrup and not maple flavored syrup if you really want to replicate the syrup sold by the world leading coffee conglomerate.
  • Cinnamon Stick: It is significantly better are more flavorsome if you use a cinnamon stick than ground cinnamon.
  • Fine Sea Salt: Anything that is sweet will need a little dash of salt to chill out and mellow the flavors. I’ve noticed that there is not a difference in flavor if you use Himalayan pink salt. Both sea salt and pink Himalayan sea salt contain 80+ different trace minerals.

Let’s get to using those ingredients, but first a quick word about the brown sugar simple syrup ratio.

Brown Sugar Simple Syrup Ratio

A simple syrup can be made using any sugar to water ratio that you want. I know for a fact that coffee syrups are made using a 1:1 ratio which makes it more liquid and easier to dissolve in a hot coffee as well as a cold coffee drink.

However,

a 2:1 ratio with twice as much sugar as there is water has its advantages as it can stay fresh indefinitely, and you can use it to decorate the inside of a tall glass and make eye-catching tiger stripes.

Sugar and its sweetness is measured on the brix scale. A 2:1 ratio is not twice as sweet; it is 26.27% sweeter than a 1:1 ratio. If you opt to make a rich syrup with a 2:1 ratio, you’ll need to use just over a quarter less sugar to obtain the same level of sweetness in your drink.

Brown Sugar Simple Syrup Ratio
Brown Sugar Simple Syrup Ratio Matter

Read: Brown sugar syrup

Homemade Brown Sugar Syrup For Coffee Instructions

This DIY Starbucks copycat recipe can be made in about 5 minutes.

Step 1: Weigh 150 Grams (5 Oz) Of Light Brown Sugar

Weigh your light brown sugar and add it to a saucepan.

Step 2: Weigh 150 Grams (5 Oz) Or Measure 150 ml (5 Oz) Of Water

Use the best possible water that you can find. Mineral water or filtered water is best. Add your water to your saucepan with your 150 grams (5 Oz) of water. Add a dash of fine sea salt and your cinnamon stick. Add two teaspoons of maple syrup.

Step 3: Heat Your Water Using A Low To Medium Heat

It is important for you to control your heat using a low to medium heat. Use a thermometer to ensure that your solution does not get hotter than 60C (140F).

If your water goes above 140F (60C) it will burn your sugar and you will start to get burnt flavors in your syrup. As your water is heating, stir well to help all the sugar to dissolve. As it reaches 55C (130F) take it off the heat as the latent temperature of your saucepan will cause the water to rise in temperature.

Dip the bottom of your saucepan in water to cool the bottom and prevent it from rising the temperature of your sugar and water mix.

Keep stirring as the water cools. Stop stirring when your sugar has completely dissolved. Leave your solution to cool for approximately 24 hours with your cinnamon stick.

After 24 hours has passed, remove your cinnamon stick and decant into an airtight container. Your syrup will keep well for 4 – 5 months.

Tips For Making The Perfect Starbucks Brown Sugar Syrup

Here are some tips for making your Starbucks brown sugar syrup perfect:

  • Use a low to medium heat. Some recipes require a medium heat, a low medium heat allows for better control and ensuring yoru mixture does not reach 60C (140F) or above.
  • Use a thermometer to monitor the temperature. If you just heat the water or let it boil and simmer, chances are it will boil and burn your sugar. Your goal is to get a rich earthy caramel flavor from the molasses without burning the sugar.
  • Use pure maple syrup. Do not replace the maple syrup with a similar lower quality product like maple-flavored syrup. These are two different products with different tastes.
Tips For Making The Perfect Starbucks Brown Sugar Syrup
The Secret Ingredient

Storage Instructions

Always use an airtight container to store your brown sugar simple syrup. A food-safe glass pump jar is perfect; a mason jar is good too.

Since this home-made version contains no preservatives, it is best that you store it in your fridge.

Brown Sugar Syrup Starbucks Calories

At Starbucks, a standard rule of thumb for the amount of sugar and calories in their syrups is 5 grams of sugar and 20 calories.

However,

Brown sugar syrup breaks with this mold as it is a half pump. And this has 2.5 grams of sugar and 10 calories per pump.

Brown Sugar Syrup Starbucks Buy It Instead Of Making It

If you don’t feel like making brown sugar syrup, you can go long to your local Starbucks and buy a bottle. Some stores sell it, but it depends on their stock levels and how much they have.

Not too many people request to purchase their simple syrups. You can also buy all flavors of their simple syrup on Amazon.

Frequently Asked Questions About How To Make Starbucks Brown Sugar Syrup

What Is Starbucks Brown Sugar Syrup Made Of?

Starbucks and their tasty brown sugar syrup is made with brown sugar and water in equal ratios. Preservatives and natural flavors are added to enhance the flavor and the shelf life. The result is a syrup that is rich in molasses and a simple syrup that is great in many coffee beverages, including their iced brown sugar oat milk shaken espresso.

What Is The Closest Thing To Starbucks Brown Sugar Syrup?

The brown sugar syrup, both the original and sugar-free version, is the closest that you will find to Starbucks brown sugar syrup. You can buy the real thing at a Starbucks outlet or from Amazon, or you can try Torani if you so must.

How Much Sugar Is In One Pump Of Brown Sugar Syrup Starbucks?

There are 5 grams and 20 calories in each pump of simple syrup at Starbuck, regardless of which flavor. Keep this in mind when you are ordering drinks from Starbucks.

  • Short 8 Oz (240 ml): 1 pump.
  • Tall 12 Oz (360 ml): 2 pumps.
  • Grande 16 Oz (480 ml): 3 pumps.
  • Venti 20 Oz (600 ml): 4 pumps.

From the bullet points above you can see that the calories from the brown sugar syrup in your coffee drink can range from 20 to as much as 80 calories.

Does Starbucks Use Monin?

No, Starbucks has their own brand of simple syrups in a range of popular flavors. Despite the claims by some coffee blogs that Starbucks uses monin vanilla syrup, or any other flavor of monin this is simply not true.

Do Starbucks Sell Their Brown Sugar Syrup?

Yes, you can walk in and buy a bottle of brown sugar syrup at Starbucks or you can buy it online from many outlets like Target, Amazon and Walmart to name a few.

What Syrup Does Starbucks Use For The Brown Sugar Shaken Espresso?

For their brown sugar shaken espresso, Starbucks uses brown sugar simple syrup and maple syrup. Made with oat milk, it is an amazing and tasty shaken espresso.

How Many Pumps Of Brown Sugar Syrup In A Brown Sugar Shaken Espresso?

The number of pumps of brown sugar syrup in a brown sugar syrup shaken espresso is as follows:

  • Short 8 Oz (240 ml): 1 pump.
  • Tall 12 Oz (360 ml): 2 pumps.
  • Grande 16 Oz (480 ml): 3 pumps.
  • Venti 20 Oz (600 ml): 4 pumps.

Why Are Monin Syrups So Expensive?

Monin syrups are so expensive for two reasons, quality and the fact that they are organic.

Unfortunately organic products tend to be more expensive due to the higher production costs involved with the making of the product and the increased desirability of organic products.

Final Thoughts – How To Make Starbucks Brown Sugar Syrup

Learning how to make Starbucks sugar syrup at home will help you to take your home barista skills to the next level. It’s one thing to make amazing coffee and another thing to make great flavored syrups.

When you make it, use it for your cold brew coffee, iced latte and cappuccino as well as hot drinks, like a breve and macchiato for a new flavor dynamic.

Join our cool coffee community and tell us about your experience with making this recipe. Did you get it to match Starbuck exactly? Do you have your own secret ingredient? Find us on Facebook/Meta.

Coffee is love, it's more than love — it's a passion of mine. I've had the luck to have travelled and enjoyed the most exotic of coffee's and unique flavors, brewing methods and techniques of making the perfect coffee from Thai hill tribe coffee to Indonesian volcanic coffee, Malaysian coffee that comes in a tea bag and the array of flavors in Vietnam, from Vanilla to Orange to Coconut to Avocado to even salt coffee and the famous egg coffee. The best part of my coffee adventures is getting to mix with the locals over a nice brew and learning how they make it! I'm cited and referenced on Google Scholar for the topic of coffee. Learn more about me and Latte Love Brew by checking our About Page

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