How To Clean Aluminum Coffee Percolator Effortlessly!

How To Clean Aluminum Coffee Percolator Effortlessly!

This article is all about how to clean aluminum coffee percolator with next to no effort. By the time you have read this article, you will know exactly what you need to do to get your dirty percolator back to its best and make you a great cup of coffee that you love and enjoy.

These techniques will work no matter what your coffee percolator is made of, be it a stainless steel coffee pot, an aluminium coffee maker, glass coffee pots, or a percolator made of any material.

These techniques work, are effortless and will work for the toughest of coffee stains.

How To Clean Old Aluminum Percolator

This is a particular question that I have been emailed and PM’d on social media by people who have an old aluminum percolator that is still working perfectly well and by those that have a rather cool looking retro aluminum percolator.

If you are the proud owner of one of those types of devices, pay attention to the techniques I am about to reveal as they will help you to get your coffee pot nice clean and free from coffee residue.

How To Clean Old Aluminum Percolator
An old aluminum coffee percolator

Read: How to clean a stainless steel coffee percolator

How To Clean A Percolator With Baking Soda And Vinegar

Before I start detailing how to clean your coffee percolator with baking soda and vinegar, two unthought of cleaning products that work very well to get all types of coffee machines clean and clear of scale and mineral deposits.

Let’s get this cleaning process started with my favorite coffee pot cleaner, which is regular dish soap.

How To Get Your Coffee Pot Clean With Soap

Regular, unscented soap should be what you use for your daily cleaning of your coffee machines. Nothing gets coffee oils away like regular soap, good old fashioned unscented dishwasher detergent is best.

The technique is simple, but has a little twist and a special ingredient – uncooked rice.

First put an abundance of soap.The best type is unscented and give the inside and outside of your percolator a good clean with a soft sponge or cloth.

Then fill with hot, almost boiling water and rinse well.

Now for the special treatment and the special ingredient.

Put a good amount of soap in your coffee maker. Add in some uncooked rice and a little warm water. Give this soap and rice water solution a very good shake and swirl. Give it a very, very good swirl for a minute or two and repeat a couple of time.

The rice acts as an abrasive agent and helps you to remove some of the coffee pot stains. For the tough stains, you will need to use either vinegar, baking soda or both.

Note: This technique works very well with a little cold water and crushed ice cubes. Filling only to the halfway mark. For some reason, it seems to have more of an abrasive effect.

Cleaning Your Percolator With Vinegar

Cleaning your coffee maker with distilled white vinegar is the best type of vinegar to use. Using vinegar will help you to remove some difficult to remove stains and any hard limescale and mineral deposits with little effort at all.

Simply pour in hot water to the halfway point and top up your percolator or coffee carafe to the top. Always put the hot or warm water in first. Always pour water first to any mix that you are making to clean your coffee pot or percolator.

The reason is simple, either it is flammable, as is the case of white vinegar or it is acidic or alkaline and may have a detrimental corrosive effect on the interior of your coffee carafe or coffee pot.

Now, simply switch on your electric percolator or put your stovetop percolator on the stove and run a percolating cycle for 20 to 30 minutes for a good proper clean.

Running a percolating cycle with your water and vinegar mix will get the tough stains removed and the hard to reach tough mineral deposits and scale.

One cycle is often enough to get the job done. However, if you need to, run a second and third cycle.

When you are finished, pour out and remove the dirty water and rinse well, very well with cold water.

Rinsing well is important as you don’t want your coffee take on any taste of white vinegar.

Cleaning Your Percolator With Vinegar
Distilled white vinegar is the best type to use

Cleaning Your Aluminum Percolator With Baking Soda

If regular dish detergent and soapy water is not getting your coffee percolator clean I am absolutely confident that baking soda will.

This method is simple, every bit as simple as the above method.

Put a cup of baking soda in your carafe and then fill with plain water, neither hot nor cold. Let your carafe steep for 20 minutes to 30 minutes.

Once you have let your carafe steep for 20 min, run a percolating cycle and let your solution percolate for 20 min to 30 minutes to get a real good deep clean.

Then rinse your carafe with water, a lot of water.

If it is still dirty you can repeat the cycle and add an additional half a cup of baking soda.

For very stubborn stains, you can make a concentrated paste with baking soda and a tiny drop of water and rub it in over the stain and leave it for a few minutes to take effect.

When you are finished rinse well with clean water, don’t be afraid of rinsing with a crazy amounts of water. You absolutely must rid your coffee maker of any traces, hints and scents of the cleaning solution.

Coffee absorbs odors and will bring those odors into your subsequent batch or cups of coffee.

I always insist you give it a very good final clean by filling it with cool water and percolating the water for 20 to 30 minutes.

Frappé-Ing It All Up – How To Clean Aluminum Coffee Percolator

Cleaning your aluminum coffee percolator is not difficult, and it does not to cause you to use too much elbow grease. I don’t advise you to use steel wool or any abrasive cleaners that may cause the scratching of your coffee percolator.

Do clean it after every use with dish soap and every week or second week run a white vinegar or bicarbonate of soda to keep your percolator well maintained, clean and free from scale build up.

Coffee is love, it's more than love — it's a passion of mine. I've had the luck to have travelled and enjoyed the most exotic of coffee's and unique flavors, brewing methods and techniques of making the perfect coffee from Thai hill tribe coffee to Indonesian volcanic coffee, Malaysian coffee that comes in a tea bag and the array of flavors in Vietnam, from Vanilla to Orange to Coconut to Avocado to even salt coffee and the famous egg coffee. The best part of my coffee adventures is getting to mix with the locals over a nice brew and learning how they make it! I'm cited and referenced on Google Scholar for the topic of coffee.

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