How Long Do Green Coffee Beans Last Long Term Storage Options!

How Long Do Green Coffee Beans Last? Long Term Storage Options!

Buying, using and roasting your own green coffee beans is a great idea and a better idea before you get your hands on them is to know how long do green coffee beans last and what you can do to store them perfectly to manage moisture levels and increase, or at least maintain the shelf life of your green beans.

If this is your goal and what you want to achieve, then stay tuned and keep reading!

What Are Green Coffee Beans?

Green coffee beans are raw and unroasted dried coffee beans that are inside the coffea fruits that are found on the coffee plant, be they Arabica, Robusta, Liberica or Excelsa coffee beans. They contain more chlorogenic acid than regular roasted coffee beans. It is because of the chlorogenic acid content that green coffee beans are believed to be healthier than roasted beans and have beneficial health benefits.

These green beans are not particularly good for making a cup of coffee, although it is possible, your cuppa Joe will taste very grassy.

It is important to note that all coffee beans start out as green coffee beans. This is what you should buy if and when you want to take up the art of home roasting.

What Are Green Coffee Beans
Dried green coffee beans.

Read: How many tablespoons in a coffee scoop?

How Long Do Green Coffee Beans Last?

This is a great question as already roasted coffee beans have a very short use by date, typically 2 weeks after roasting. The peak flavor of coffee beans are usually even shorter with a 7-day window of 3 days after roasting and 7 days there after.

Lengthy storage times of roasted coffee beans can and will lead to you losing the bold flavors and most of the flavor of coffee will have gone. Old, poorly stored coffee can go rancid which is why proper coffee bean storage practices must be followed.

Pro Tip: Store your roasted beans in a vacuum coffee canister that is airtight and has a one way valve. Then store your coffee beans in your freezer. They won’t freeze, and they will keep maximum freshness for longer.

Green coffee beans on the other hand can last for up to a whole year before you lose the aroma, taste and unique flavors as long as you store them properly in the correct environment and conditions which brings us to the topic of green bean coffee storage techniques and methods which I’ll talk about in a second.

How Long Do Green Coffee Beans Last
Green coffee beans last for 12 months.

Green Coffee Beans Long Term Storage

To keep your green coffee beans fresher for longer and, since you are likely storing them for a long time since they can keep well for up to 12 months.

To help maintain your green coffee freshness factor you must follow all the regular and usual rules of storing coffee beans.

Make sure you keep them in an opaque coffee cannister that is specifically designed for the purpose of storing coffee beans. A simple generic ceramic or glass container is not good enough. The cannister must be airtight and if possible, vacuum for a much better quality. A one way valve that prevents oxygen from getting in yet allows carbon dioxide that is emitted to escape is a must.

It is a must to store in a dry area away from harsh light and heat. I don’t suggest at all that you store your coffee cannister with your green beans in them in the freezer. Your fridge is good enough here, as is regular room temperature.

How To Store Your Green Coffee Beans At Home

The best way to store your coffee beans at home to help maintain the shelf life of 12 months and enjoy fresh coffees of a wide range of roast levels that you can make  is to keep them in a professional coffee cannister that is dark in color and able to keep out bright lights or high light levels.

Following those tips and keeping your cannister in the fridge helps you to keep them at a regular temperature level and humidity level and avoids extreme temperatures for extended periods of both a hot and humid summer and cold winters.

FAQ Frequently Asked Questions

Here is a short list of frequently asked questions about how long green coffee beans last.

Do Green Coffee Beans Go Bad?

Yes!

Nothing will stay fresh and perfect forever. Despite the fact that they will stay well for about a year, they will still start to go off after that. Beyond the year point I strongly suggest that you don’t brew or roast your green coffee beans.

Yes, green coffee beans do go bad!

How Do You Know If Green Coffee Beans Are Bad?

If you have kept them in a place that is too dry, your green coffee beans will lose their flavor and aroma. On the other extreme, if you have stored your green coffee beans in an environment that is too humid, they will absorb the excess humidity in the air and start to become wet, slightly soggy and grow mold.

How Long Do Coffee Beans Last In A Sealed Bag?

Coffee beans typically last 6 to 9 months in an unopened bag. When you open they you will get top fresh coffee for the first 10 days at their peak freshness. After 2 weeks the taste starts to degrade but they are still good to go to make coffee for up to 6 months before they go rancid.

If you freeze them, keep them in your freezer you coffee beans can last for up to 2 years.

Frappé-Ing It All Up! – How Long Do Green Coffee Beans Last?

Green coffee beans are good for up to 12 months as long as you store them well in the correct and ideal conditions. If you keep them in less than ideal conditions then you can expect to reduce the storage period considerably.

Coffee is love, it's more than love — it's a passion of mine. I've had the luck to have travelled and enjoyed the most exotic of coffee's and unique flavors, brewing methods and techniques of making the perfect coffee from Thai hill tribe coffee to Indonesian volcanic coffee, Malaysian coffee that comes in a tea bag and the array of flavors in Vietnam, from Vanilla to Orange to Coconut to Avocado to even salt coffee and the famous egg coffee. The best part of my coffee adventures is getting to mix with the locals over a nice brew and learning how they make it! I'm cited and referenced on Google Scholar for the topic of coffee.

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