Can You Put A Coffee Pot On The Stove A Glass Pot Disaster Move

Can You Put A Coffee Pot On The Stove? A Glass Pot Disaster Move?

The question is not can you put a coffee pot on the stove, but can you put a glass coffee pot on the stove?  Which is a very good question! Many of us fear, or dread an exploding coffee pot full of hot coffee and rightly so!

Gone wrong, it is dangerous and can injure you and make one heck of a mess to clean up!

With no further a due, let’s see what’s brewing and get right to it!

Can You Put A Coffee Pot On The Stove?

Yes,

it depends on what type of coffee pot that you are using. With a regular metal or stainless steel pot like a Moka pot and Turkish coffee pots, you have no worries at all regarding using them on your stove.

A glass coffee pot, however, is something to be careful with.

A regular glass coffee pot has the potential to go bad. I have had an experience where pots of this kind just blow up under the excessive heat and end up with coffee and glass everywhere!

Not at all a pretty sight!

You can put a Pyrex glass coffee pot on the stove and have it slowly percolate and brew your coffee for you without any worry about your pot becoming damaged, broken or exploding in front of you.

For the sake of your own safety, make sure the glass coffee percolator is a Pyrex glass one and not regular glass.

Due diligence here will save you from a shattered coffee maker!

Can You Put A Coffee Pot On The Stove
You can put a coffee pot on the stove

Read: Old fashioned stovetop coffee pot

How To Use A Pyrex Glass Coffee Pot

Using a glass Pyrex coffee percolator is very easy and straight forward. Let’s get on with detailing the instructions on how to brew coffee using this type of coffee maker.

Pyrex Percolator Coffee Maker Instructions

To make and brew coffee with a glass percolator, first locate and remove the stem and filter basket. Once you have done this, fill the bottom chamber with as much cold water as you want to make. This lower chamber for water will later become your coffee chamber, full of brewed coffee.

If you want to make 6 x 8 ounce cups of coffee, fill it with 6 x 8 ounces of water (48 ounces (1.44 Litre)).

Now replace the coffee filter basket and stem and add your coffee grounds. The grounds should be of a coarse grind similar in size to kosher salt.

As a general rule of thumb, you should use 1 tablespoon of coffee per cup of coffee that you want to make. At Latte Love Brew we advise using exact measurements to help you get predictable and consistent results.

Percolator coffee is typically a 1:12 coffee to water ratio. For 48 ounces of water by weight, you should use 4 ounces of coffee, approximately speaking is 120 grams of coffee grounds for 1.44 kg of water.

Once your grounds and water are ready, put your Pyrex glass percolator on your stove at a medium heat and keep an eye on it as it brews. When your coffee gets to your ideal color and taste, stop brewing and remove it from the heat.

Taste and find out if your brew is hitting that sweet spot flavor profile that you like. If it is, remove the coffee filter and the stem to prevent over brewing. Then serve and enjoy your coffee.

Pyrex Percolator Coffee Maker Instructions
Making coffee with a Pyrex glass percolator

How Long Should I Percolate My Coffee On The Stovetop?

Your coffee will typically percolate for 5 to 10 minutes. There is no “should” in terms of how long as your taste profile and how you like your cup of coffee to be is not how another person may like their cup of coffee to be. Typically, as a general figure, 5 minutes to 10 minutes is enough.

The key to a great Cuppa Joe with a percolator is to keep an eye on your pot of coffee and its color and taste frequently to ensure that you get it spot on. Just as a chef tastes his food while cooking, as a home barista you should taste your brew, especially when you are making batches of coffee.

Once your coffee is ready, remove your percolator from the heat to prevent over brewing.

How Long Should I Percolate My Coffee On The Stovetop
Keep an eye on your coffee pot while you brew

Can I Use Regular Ground Coffee In A Pyrex Glass Percolator Coffee Pot?

When it comes to ground coffee, regardless of your brewing method, be it drip coffee, cold brew, percolator or what ever, as a regular coffee drinker and coffee lover, it is much better that you grind your own beans. With your own coffee grinder you can grind them freshly on the spot just as you are about to make your coffee and, as a result, you will get a fresher coffee flavor.

Regular ground coffee in a Pyrex glass coffee percolator may be okay, but, you must ensure that they are of a coarse grind size. Coarse ground coffee will bring out the full flavor where as a smaller grind size will slip through your filter basket, the coffee ground receptacle and into your pot of coffee.

Coffee granules, instant coffee granule, will not work as they will just dissolve into the hot water and result in a weak watery coffee. A percolator is simply not designed for soluble coffee.

Can I Use Regular Ground Coffee In A Pyrex Glass Percolator Coffee Pot
A coarse grind works best for percolators.

Do I Need A To Use A Coffee Filter For A Percolator?

No,

you do not need to use a coffee filter with a percolator. The coffee basket doubles up as a filter basket and prevents the coffee granules from entering the water below and making your coffee gritty.

If you were to add a filter it would only serve to remove the coffee oils,and reduce the quality of your coffee and be detrimental to its flavor.

Glass Pyrex Percolator Pros And Cons

One of the plus points to glass stove top percolators is that you can see what is going on with your brew due to being see through. Thanks to which, you can judge how well your coffee is brewed based on its color.

A nice plus point that I like is the cool retro look from yesteryear. The coffee quality is generally good as an “every day” coffee and as far as coffee caffeine content goes it is good and what you expect from a normal coffee. No big kick, and no lag either.

Not everything is sunshine and rainbows and there are some drawbacks.

Unlike electric percolators, the more modern version of percolators or stainless steel, you need to keep an eye on them while they brew and percolate away. If you don’t, you will likely over extract and end up with a bitter tasting coffee. You also risk some damage to your coffee pot.

Frappé-Ing It All Up – Can You Put A Coffee Pot On The Stove?

If anyone ask you if you can put a coffee pot on the stove, tell them that they most certainly can and if they ask about putting a glass coffee pot on a stove drill it into them to check that it is a pyrex glass coffee stove to save them from any unwanted accidents and kitchen disasters.

Coffee is love, it's more than love — it's a passion of mine. I've had the luck to have travelled and enjoyed the most exotic of coffee's and unique flavors, brewing methods and techniques of making the perfect coffee from Thai hill tribe coffee to Indonesian volcanic coffee, Malaysian coffee that comes in a tea bag and the array of flavors in Vietnam, from Vanilla to Orange to Coconut to Avocado to even salt coffee and the famous egg coffee. The best part of my coffee adventures is getting to mix with the locals over a nice brew and learning how they make it! I'm cited and referenced on Google Scholar for the topic of coffee.

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